Phanthian Zuesongdham

Hamburg Port Authority

Head of Division Port Process Solution

Dr. Phanthian ZUESONGDHAM born in Bangkok, Thailand. She holds a BA in international transport management and an MBA in finance and logistics. Since her first graduation, she worked with different international organizations such as UNESCAP, Lufthansa Cargo AG, and Deutsche BP AG as well as at Hamburg University of Technology and Jacobs University in Bremen. In 2010 she obtained her Ph.D. in process management and maritime logistics.

In the same year, Phanthian joined the Hamburg Port Authority (HPA). She has set up and established Process Management as a steering instrument for all hierarchies in the organization and proved that anyone can apply process management in their daily life. She has been taking different senior management roles of various units within the HPA to drive digital transformation. Since 2015 she has been appointed as Head of the smartPORT Programme Management in the matrix organization. She is also active in many working groups concerned with digitalization and many innovation-related initiatives in the transport and logistics industry on a national, European, and international level. She specializes in process management, enterprise architecture, project cargo, risk management, intermodal logistics (especially sea and air transports), and port management. As of December 01, 2020, Phanthian is now responsible for Business Division Port Process Solution focusing on optimization of processes across the port of Hamburg and business development. Also, in 2020 she has been awarded as Digital Female Leader in the category Digital Transformation.

Phanthian spends her leisure time reading, music, podcast, documentary reports, and stand-up paddling.

SESSIONS WITH Phanthian Zuesongdham

Monday, 21 June

  • 03:15pm - 03:45pm (CET) / 21/jun/2021 01:15 pm - 21/jun/2021 01:45 pm

    Data Collaboration

    Are Ports Ready for Automation?

    Virtual
    What should ports plan in terms of adequate landside infrastructure such as highways and rail networks capable of integrating future automation inside and outside ports? Is there a trade off between efficiency improvements and loss of labor opportunities? How can ports in developing countries realistically embrace automation?